The No bullshit guide to linear algebra files on gumroad were updated. The book is now v2 beta 2, and scheduled for release in early January 2017.

If you’re taking a linear algebra class this term, or need to know linear algebra for a more advanced class, this will be the best money you spend this semester.

 

Why?

Math is power. Specifically, the ability to use math models to describe real-world phenomenon and predict the future is a powerful general tool to add to you toolbox. Linear algebra has applications to many fields. In general, understanding basic math, and specifically functions of the form \(f(x)=y\) like \(x,x^2,x^3,x^n,e^x,\ln(x),\sin(x),\cos(x),\tan(x),\ldots\) opens many doors for mathematical modelling.

Linear algebra is the study of linear transformations, or vector functions of the form \(T(\vec{v}) = \vec{w}\). The linear transformations take vectors \(\vec{v}\) as inputs and produce vectors \(\vec{w}\) as outputs.  Many real-world phenomena in computer science, physics, chemistry, biology, and many other fields can be modeled as vector quantities, so linear algebra has countless applications. Linear algebra is the vector extension to your math modelling toolbox.

 

How?

Everyone knows that math is useful, but people much rather leave the learning of math to other people, rather than learn math themselves. Most people imagine learning math is a difficult task, like carrying big bags of potatoes up a steep hill. Surely, such hard work is not for everyone, and we should delegate all the potato-carrying to experts in the field (mathematicians, scientists, and engineers). This way of thinking gave us a modern world where only a small portion of the world is math literate. Everyone else lives in ignorance and fear of all things mathematical.

It doesn’t need to be this way. Everyone can learn math—even advanced math like linear algebra—if they follow a structured approach. Each section in the No bullshit guide to linear algebra follows the same recipe:

  • Motivation to trick readers into wanting to learn about the topic
  • Definitions of all quantities and variables relevant to the topic
  • Formulas: all the essential formulas associated with the topic are given
  • Examples that show how to use the formulas in different scenarios
  • Explanations about how the formulas are derived and how to understand them
  • Discussion about how the connections between this topic and other
  • Exercises to test your understanding of the concept
  • Links to web resources for further reading

This structure allows to get all the important information across in the shortest amount of time. The reader is free to skim through superficially, or dig in an read all the explanations. The exercises help both students and self-learners test there understanding of the material.

 

What?

The No bullshit guide to linear algebra is a short textbook that covers all the standard topics of university-level linear algebra, and also discusses applications like machine learning, computer graphics, probability theory, and quantum mechanics.

You can buy the eBook bundle here ($29, includes all future updates). The book is currently being edited, so it’s likely to see some further improvements to the chapters on applications, but the main material (that which will be on a an exam) is absolutely solid now.

@Students: get in touch with me if you’d like to be a “test subject” for the new  problem sets. I wrote 50+ pages of new problems and solutions for the book, and I could use your help to double-check the answers.

One thought on “Linear algebra v2 beta release

  1. I like your text on Linear Algebra. I wonder whether you will do some videos on Linear Algebra. How about Algebraic Geometry. Keep up the Good Work Professor Savov.

    Robert

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

css.php